138 Inspirational Facebook Ads

Looking for some inspiration for your next Facebook ad? Here are some great examples for your next idea.

Swipe ideas from some of the best Facebook ads

COLOUR

Advertiser: Annies Homegrown

An ad that is more than a passing resemblance to an M&S Food (this is more than...), this uses video to get your attention.

It's doubtful if this is a deliberate attempt, being a US brand.

Notice how the colours in the video also match the brand colours too, which is a great little tough.

Tags
colourvideo

Advertiser: Facebook for Business

Given that Facebook are experts at psychological marketing techniques, I'm a little underwhelmed by their ad, which is advertising Facebook ads themselves.

Sure, it covers the basics (it's simple, and gets the message across), but I feel that it can be much better by:

1. Explaining the benefits (eg grow your brand)

2. Using stronger, and higher-contrast colours

3. Being clearer about ad placements

4. Adding a strong call-to-action

5. Including an offer/incentive, such as £15 free credit

Tags
thinkingcolourcall-to-actionbenefits

Advertiser: Mashable

The striking illustration of a colourful lion is really effective in this ad. Chances are you looked at it before you read the copy.

If I'd have designed it, I would have had the lion looking upwards towards the introductory text (or downwards towards the deal). Making contact between eyes is effective, but even more so when the eyes are drawn to key elements, such as titles and headings.

With the exception of a couple of superlatives dotted around in the copy, the words don't 'sparkle' as much as I think they could.

Tags
colouranimalssuperlativesdeals

Advertiser: OpenMoney

Cue the beautiful woman in full-on model pose, with her laptop and the obligatory cup of coffee.

Yes, this screams 'stock photography', but at least this ad from Open Money tries hard to fuse it with brand colours.

Of course, stock photography alone isn't going to break your campaign. Many do it successfully. But it just feels a little too similar to many others that are pumped out day after day.

Originally, this ad caught my attention. Perhaps it was the colours. But looking at it with fresh eyes I wouldn't really say that this ad is particularly well concieved. I've left it in this list because there are some lessons to be learned.

First, the opening sentence starts with 'We'. I don't recommend that, simply because if you talk about your business, viewers are likely to think 'so what?

Sure, it then goes on to tell you that you can get personalised financial advice, but the main benefits are lost, and it all feels a little negative.

Now, I know that they are obliged to state that 'capital at risk', but I'd have added that to the description at the bottom of the ad. I'm not going to go off running to see if that's permissable, but you get the idea - you're throwing up objections and obstacles in the are that should be concentrating on benefits.

The inclusion of the link (with all its tracking tags) is a distraction too.

Not a great ad from OpenMoney. Missed opportunities galore.

Tags
objectionsyoustock photographybeautycolourbenefits

Advertiser: Royal Mail

When traditional marketing and advertising campaigns are being threatened with modern digital techniques, then you've got to do everything you can to compete.

And Royal Mail are doing just that with their ad campaign, which is encouraging businesses to consider direct mail (door drops) as an effective alternative.

The visual graphic is very well designed, and manages your expectations by showing you what you're about to get. Sure, it's obviously a lead magnet (and the lead form on the landing page isn't quite GDPR-compliant), but the combination of a powerful image and well-produced copy has resulted in an excellent ad.

Tags
colourfulattentionlead magnetfreeauthority

Advertiser: Shopify Plus

Over the last year or so, I've seen some excellent marketing campaigns coming out of the Shopify HQ, and this one is no exception.

Firstly, I love the simple colour scheme (there isn't really one!), because it's striking and is begging for your eyeball's attention.

Secondly the language used is clever, because it makes a series of statements that makes you ask What? What? What?. Naturally, you want to keep reading until you find out what the hell they're going on about.

It's a difficult tactic to get just right. And for Shopify Plus, they've nailed it.

Tags
thinkingcuriositycolour



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